adelaide physio

How To Make Friends With Your Hamstrings

The hamstrings have a long history of being the 'enemy' of good movement.

Tight, painful, cramping and all around bad guy, the poor old hammy cops a lot of negative press.

In this blog post, I wanted to share my thoughts with you about how to make friends with the hamstrings so you can all get on well together. 

What are the hamstrings?

The hamstrings are made up of three muscles - the inside two are called the semimembranous and semitendinosus and the large outside hamstring is known as the biceps femoris. 

The back of a right leg from hip to knee

The back of a right leg from hip to knee

In a bigger contex:

The Superficial Back Line, from Thomas Myers Anatomy Trains

The Superficial Back Line, from Thomas Myers Anatomy Trains

The hamstrings are part of the Superficial Back Line - which is a myofascial line of tissue that incorporates the muscles and fascia from the bottom of the foot up to the back of the head. 

When one area isn't functionally overly well, there will be compensations up or down the chain.  Ever heard of hamstring issues affecting your lower back? 

Tight hamstrings means that the instead of stretch and movement occurring through the back of the leg, the lower back gets compressed, especially when sitting or bending forwards. 

That is one of the reasons we take a holistic view of your body and movement when you come in for an assessment.  We leave no stone unturned in our quest to get to the source of your problem. 

It doesn't matter where you feel your symptoms, we don't chase pain.  We focus on finding the weak link/primary source and then allow your (powerful healing) body to do the rest.

"Where you think it is, it ain't" - Ida Rolf

What is the role of the hamstrings?

The primary role of the hamstrings in walking and running is to eccentrically control the landing of the foot.  The hamstring complex undergoes a substantial eccentric contraction during the late swing phase (Yu et al, 2008) of gait.

Eccentric refers to a type of contraction where a muscle lengthens while contracting vs a concentric contraction where the muscle in contracting and shortening (e.g. doing a bicep curl). 

As you can see, just before your foot lands, your knee is going from a bent position to an extended straight position and the hamstrings job is to allow for a controlled, smooth landing.

As you can see, just before your foot lands, your knee is going from a bent position to an extended straight position and the hamstrings job is to allow for a controlled, smooth landing.

Whilst it is important to have adequate flexibility, the actual more important job of the hamstring to have enough strength and capacity to walk and run properly.

If a muscle doesn't have much capacity to contract when needed, it will most likely get overloaded.  When it gets overloaded, it's muscle fibers contract and knot up, limiting flexibility.

For a runner, strength and stability trumps flexibility everyday of the week.

Trigger points in the hamstrings can refer pain to the upper thigh, buttock and around the knee

Trigger points in the hamstrings can refer pain to the upper thigh, buttock and around the knee

3 Steps To Making Friends With Your Hamstrings:

1.  Stop stretching them. 

Never again do a standing hamstring stretch.  I don't mean avoid it for a few weeks or months.

I mean NEVER* do this stretch whilst you are alive on this planet! 

Like an addict, you gotta give it up cold turkey. 

Yes, you can still do yoga and downward dog and continue to move through functional range of movements but no mindless, static stretching. 

S  tretching  in this position, you are actually making the  hamstring weaker

Stretching in this position, you are actually making the hamstring weaker

Hang on a sec...I thought stretching was a good thing!?

Stretching the hamstring in this position, you are actually making the hamstring weaker and sending confusing mixed messages to the brain about what the function of the muscle is. 

Anytime your brain is confused, it's going straight into fight-flight mode and will want to tighten everything up to protect it.

Intuitively stretching feels good and it often does give some short term relief. 

But in the long run, with continued stretching, the hamstring becomes weaker and more likely to become overloaded and tight.  Then you've got yourself into a real pickle. 

The hamstring, once locked down, becomes an inefficient blob that hampers everything you try and do.

Our first step in making friends with the hamstring is to stop pissing it off, so no more stretching. 

By the way, as an added bonus, your lower back pain and sciatica will thank you as the standing hamstring stretch has a good way of irritating it.

*If you desperately feel the need to stretch, then you can apply heat packs or use the foam roller/spiky ball directly on the muscle. 

2.  Reset.

To reset the hamstrings, I recommend first releasing the muscle with 3-4 sessions of deep tissue dry needling and myo-fascial release massage.  This is like pushing re-set on your muscle tone and creating a fresh slate to work with.  After a few sessions, the muscle will release and then we can move onto the final step.

It's important to get a twitch response that stimulates the blood flow and releases the chemicals in the muscle that have been holding it tight. 

Be prepared for some significant post-treatment soreness for a 1-2 days.  Months/years/decades of tightness ain't going down without a fight!

Check out more about dry needling here and see how it can get your healing on the fast track. 

3.  Build 'Em Back Up.

The biggest issue around the hamstring is it's near universal lack of strength

When was the last time you did a specific hamstring strengthening exercise? 

Most of us tend towards an excessive quads/hip flexors vs hamstrings ratio due to excess sitting, walking and running. 

Quads are strong, hammies weak.

This imbalance is perceived by the hamstrings as threatening

Powerfully contracting the quads during the running and kicking motion could potentially damage the hamstring. 

How does the brain / muscle respond to threat? 

You guessed - it tightens up.

Graduated Strengthening Program For Hamstrings:

The best long term strategy to make friends with your hamstrings is to build capacity so they can perform their job of eccentrically controlling the foot in landing.

If the hamstrings can happily do their job, they'll most likely start to feel safe, protected and will naturally start to release all on their very own. 

Trust me, I'm a Physiotherapist!

It will take time (3-6 months) to build strength, so listen to your body and take it easy at the start.  If you can only manage 2-3 reps in the beginning, that is fine.  No rushing!

The goal is to push the hamstring to fatigue (feeling some hamstring soreness the following day is a good sign) and then allow it to adapt, recover and get stronger

Make sure you create the right environment for healing via eating well (protein + vegies), drink plenty of water and get enough sleep.

Aim to do these strengthening exercises twice per week.

How many reps? 

If you figure every 10k your run is approximately 5,000 steps on each side, then the hamstring needs a fair amount of endurance capacity.  I would keep gradually increasing the reps until you are not feeling any pain on your walks and runs.

Quick note: avoid the hamstring curl machine at the gym.  This exercise strengthens and shortens the hamstring, which is what you don't want.

Step 1: Bridge

Try 3 x 30 sec holds.  Relax your lower back and squeeze your glutes.      Tuck your pelvis so you feel the opening of the front of the hips. 

Try 3 x 30 sec holds.  Relax your lower back and squeeze your glutes. 

Tuck your pelvis so you feel the opening of the front of the hips. 

Keep the bridge high as you extend one leg in front.      Hold for one breath and then switch sides.  When you can repeat x 10 each side, move to step 2.

Keep the bridge high as you extend one leg in front. 

Hold for one breath and then switch sides.  When you can repeat x 10 each side, move to step 2.

Step 2: Bridge on Foam Roller

Make sure the roller isn't too far away from you, otherwise the hamstrings will cramp.       The goal is to gradually build up the strength in the hamstrings.  It may take 3-6 months so no rushing.      If you push too hard, then you most likely will lock the muscle down and you'll have to start over.

Make sure the roller isn't too far away from you, otherwise the hamstrings will cramp.  

The goal is to gradually build up the strength in the hamstrings.  It may take 3-6 months so no rushing. 

If you push too hard, then you most likely will lock the muscle down and you'll have to start over.

When you can complete 3 x 10 reps on each side, move onto step 3.

When you can complete 3 x 10 reps on each side, move onto step 3.

Step 3: Hamstring Curls on Swiss Ball

The perfect Eccentric Hamstring Exercise: Strengthening  AND  lengthening.    Quickly pull the ball in towards you and then SLOWLY (slow as you can) lower the ball away from you.      Count to as least 5 seconds as you do this.      Repeat until fatigue. and then do another x 2 rounds.      If you can do x 30 reps pretty easily, try one legged.     Practicing this movement will have a direct improvement on your hamstring problems, especially for runners.

The perfect Eccentric Hamstring Exercise: Strengthening AND lengthening.

Quickly pull the ball in towards you and then SLOWLY (slow as you can) lower the ball away from you. 

Count to as least 5 seconds as you do this. 

Repeat until fatigue. and then do another x 2 rounds. 

If you can do x 30 reps pretty easily, try one legged.

Practicing this movement will have a direct improvement on your hamstring problems, especially for runners.

Step Four: Single Leg Deadlift

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and stand on your right leg, lifting your left leg a few inches behind you (a). Keeping your back straight, lean forward from your hips until your body is almost parallel to the floor, the weights in line with your shoulders (b). Return to start.  Do 12, then switch legs.

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and stand on your right leg, lifting your left leg a few inches behind you (a). Keeping your back straight, lean forward from your hips until your body is almost parallel to the floor, the weights in line with your shoulders (b). Return to start.  Do 12, then switch legs.

Bonus Tip:

Don't forget to strengthen the glutes, lower back and calf muscles above and below the hamstring.  Often if these muscles have reduced capacity, the hamstring can become overloaded and then lock down. 

 

So there you have it.

Have a go and please write in the comments how you get on.

I'd really appreciate your feedback :-)


References:

Hamstring muscle kinematics and activation during overground sprinting.

Yu B, Queen RM, Abbey AN, Liu Y, Moorman CT, Garrett WE. J Biomech. 2008 Nov 14;41(15):3121-6

10 Alternatives to Running When You're Injured

 

Sometimes injuries are a blessing in disguise.  They force you to re-examine your training style and open you up to other possibilities in the way you go about doing things. 

Unfortunately running injuries are common and being forced into a lay off for a few weeks/months can be quite daunting.  Being told you can't run can be a serious blow to a runner's sense of self.  You suddenly realise how addicted you are to the physical and emotional payoffs that running brings. 

Most runners tell me that there is nothing else quite like the endorphin buzz that running gives you.

Why runners are vulnerable to injury

One of the downfalls of running is that it's very repetitive and demanding on certain parts of the body that are vulnerable to overload.  Common areas include: knees, hips, ITB's, achilles, calf muscles and hamstring issues. 

Most runners generally have very good pain thresholds.  This comes as a blessing AND a curse.  Niggles that are ignored over a long period of time tend do have a tendency to develop into something more serious. 

If you are in pain, there is a good chance your Physio will recommend taking a short break from training to allow your tissues to recover and heal properly.

 

To help you get through your injury, try the following exercises, which are designed to:

1.  Maintain your cardio-vascular fitness

2.  Encourage blood flow and oxygen to assist the healing process

3.  Re-build your foundation so that you come back better and stronger that before

DISCLAIMER** Of course check with your physio to get the green light before trying any of these exercises**

Nutritious Movement

If you compare exercise to eating, running is like eating dessert and your foundation exercises (below) are like your main course. 

It's not healthy to only be eating dessert - running should be a part of wide base of 'nutritious movement'. 

This approach will sustain you and help you find longevity in your running career. 

1.  Swimming

We all know the benefits of getting in the water: the non-weight bearing movement of your body that helps decompresses the joints and allows you a full body workout without the stress of gravity wearing on your body. 

Try and build up to some intervals, for example 10 x 100m.  This will really help optimise your breathing and cardio-respiratory performance.

Even if you don't like swimming, just being in the water will be beneficial, assisting recovery.  Standing in the cold water at the beach in the middle of winter is refreshing and surprisingly therapeutic. 

 

2.  Kettlebell Strength Workout

A solid kettlebell workout is the closest thing I've come to experiencing the high that matches up with a good run.  Everyone should own a kettlebell or two.  If you have never tried, find a good personal trainer and get them to show you the basics over a few sessions.  Try swings, squats, lunges and other variations to get your body moving and re-build your capacity

 

3.  Pilates

Research tells us the biggest risk factor for an injury is a previous injury.  Pain and injury leads to compensatory movement patterning that helps us get through the short term but isn't an ideal long term solution.  Pilates help you to learn the principles of dynamic core alignment, so you will create a solid foundation that naturally leads to optimal performance in sport and life. 

Term 3 Pilates kicks of July 26th - Reserve your place here

 

4.  Stair workout

Stronger glutes = better running and lower risk of re-injury.  Stairs will also send your heart rate sky rocketing, boosting your VO2 max.

 

 

5.  Hiking

Hiking some trails in the great outdoors has a few benefits for runners:

  • build better balance on uneven terrain
  • breathe some fresh air
  • learn how to 'slow down' and enjoy the scenery
  • get to know your running friends better - talking is easier when you're not struggling to breathe!

 

6.  Boxing

Stressed?  Angry?  Let your fists do the talking.  Boxing will challenge your cardio-vascular system like nothing else.  Working with a trainer will quickly fine tune your power and precision and bring an intensity to your workout that may rival your running training.

7.  HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training)

Try something like the 7 minute workout or ask your local personal trainer to design you a program.  Add a challenge by using a foam roller or Swiss Ball to your workout.  Try a combination of burpees, squats, step-ups and mountain climbers for starters.

7-min-feature-photo-01-01.png

8.  Yoga

Reset your fundamental movement patterning, connect with your breathing and jump start your healing process by activating the para-sympathetic nervous system.  Most runners could benefit from finding a little bit more flexibility.  Restorative / yin yoga is particularly recommended for runners to keep their bodies balanced.

9.  Stand-Up Paddle-boarding

Stand-up paddle boarding is an ideal way to strengthen your core (obliques in particular that are important for runners) and also gives your quads a nice burn.  Also will improve your balance (especially if you find some fun waves to have a go at!).

10.  Elliptical / Cross Trainer

Minimal weight-bearing, using the elliptical machine is an nice way to get your blood and oxygen flowing.  It's also an easy way to keep an eye on your heart rate and push some challenging intervals sessions...crank up the resistance!

 

11.  Bonus Tip: Avoid Cycling

Despite it's popularity, I DON'T advise cycling as a good alternative to running as cycling strongly activates the hip flexors, and can mess up your muscle balance around your hip, knee and lower back. 

I would advise your to either choose cycling or running as your main form of exercise.  If you are triathlete, there are some specific exercises you can do to help reduce the negative effects of cycling.  You can email directly dan@kinfolkwellness.com.au and I will give you the details.

Over to you...

What form of exercise have you found most beneficial when you can't run? 

I'd love to hear your thoughts below.

 

3 Tips To Running Without Knee Pain

Knee pain is really common among runners (about 40% will experience in a given year). 

So...rather than ignoring it and hope its goes away...here are 3 simple tips to help you keep your knees tracking smoothly and efficiently :

1.  Increase your cadence

Research suggest a small increase in your cadence (increasing step frequency by 5%) leads to a decrease in ground reaction force

Essentially, shortening your stride takes the stress off your legs and taps into your 'spring system' that is more efficient and less impact on your knees. 

The average runner's cadence is approx 160 steps per minute, and the research shows increasing to 170-180 can make a big difference.

Be warned though, this style of running will put a greater load on your cardio-vascular system - so you may need to keep an eye on your heart rate and take breaks as needed.

Some GPS watches track your cadence.

Otherwise you can download a free metronome to help you.  I like to use the metronome for a few minutes at the start of a run to help get my rhythm in place...starting at 170bmp and then up to 180bmp for a few minutes.

 

2.  Strengthen your glutes

"Strong glutes makes everything better" - Perry Nickelston

"Strong glutes makes everything better" - Perry Nickelston

The glutes are the main protectors of the knee.  When they become weak or inhibited they allow excess pressure on the knee joint and the muscles that surround it such as the ITB. 

When running, the glutes should take most of the load.   The gluteus maximus is the biggest and most powerful muscle in the body.  But in the presence of pain, injury or excessive sitting it 'switches off' and other muscles are forced to compensate.

Here are some of our favourite exercises to get your glutes back online and functioning:

  • clam
  • bridge
  • single leg bridge
  • reverse lunge
  • squats
  • split squats

If you think your glutes might need some work...then you should join our weekly Pilates class...click here to reserve your place (spots are limited). 

Bridge:   Tuck the pelvis under lift your hips - look for a straight line between knees, hip and shoulders.  Breathe and relax the shoulders.  Hold for 1 minute x 3 sets.

Bridge:  Tuck the pelvis under lift your hips - look for a straight line between knees, hip and shoulders.  Breathe and relax the shoulders.  Hold for 1 minute x 3 sets.

3.  Foam roll AFTER you run

The muscles in your legs have to work pretty damn hard during a run - absorbing up to three times your body weight every time you land. 

Muscles such as the outer quads, ITB, calf, hamstrings and adductors can get tight and knotted up and have a lot of trouble relaxing back to 'normal' after a hard run. 

This tightness can lead to increased pressure on the patella (knee cap) and cause ongoing tracking issues with the knee. 

A quick full body tune-up can be completed in less than 90 seconds (see video below) and help iron out tight spots around the knee.  

Of course, if you are tight in a particular area, you should spend longer working out the knots.

Is Pain or Injury keeping you from being as active and healthy as you want?

4 Steps To Better Movement

Moving better is like learning any other SKILL. The brain controls movement and loves moving in HABITS.

1. "Unconscious incompetence"

Habits of repetitive movement patterns get engrained in the central nervous system. Often happens through sustained postures and repetitive tasks. Predictable patterns develop in response to pain and stress; some muscles tighten & others become inhibited.

2. "Conscious incompetence"

Becoming aware there's a problem. Pain is the major trigger to making you aware something isn't right. Other early signs might be - feeling of tightness, stiffness, inefficiency of movement, fatigue, poor sleep or digestion.
Your Physio / health care professional can help you identify certain patterns that are getting overloaded. Also meditation and performing a body scan can help.

3. "Conscious competence"

This is where the training comes in.
In the early stages, mindfulness, concentration and patience are needed. Quiet introspective practice. Lots of mistakes, each time learning and inching towards mastery. Internal and external feedback. Play and having fun with your movement journey sparks learning.

Building new motor patterns and neural pathways in the brain takes time. Aerobic exercise (like running) helps stimulate new neuronal growth. Good food and sleep assist the brain in laying down the new pathways.

4. "Unconscious competence"

Muscle memory becomes entrained and becomes a new pattern, online & available for use. The brain has more options and variability in movement. The goal isn't to move the 'right' way all the time, rather to have many options, depending on the circumstance.

 

What are your thoughts on this 4 step process? 

I'd love your comments and feedback...

Get To Know Your Muscles - TFL (Tensor Fasciae Latae)

Author: Daniel O'Grady is a Physiotherapist in Adelaide, Australia.

Most people know about their ITB (Ilio Tibial Band)  that runs on the outside of the thigh; but not as many are familiar with the strip of muscle that joins the upper part of the ITB to the pelvis. 

This small muscle is known as the TFL (Tensor Fasica Latae). 

If you’ve ever had problems with your knee, hip, lower back, calf or achilles, chances are you have some unresolved tightness in your TFL.

 

QUICK ANATOMY REVIEW:

As you can see in the picture, the ITB has upper attachments to both the gluteals and the TFL.  Any dysfucntion/weakness in the glutes means that the TFL needs to work proportionally harder.  Gluteal inhibition is common - especially if you spend a lot of time sitting.

 

PALPATE THE TFL ON YOURSELF:

To feel the TFL, place your finger on your front of your pelvic bone.  Slowly move down and to the outside of the thigh until you feel a ropey muscle that is the the width a finger.  It may be tender to touch.

 

FUNCTION:

The TFL is a hip flexor, abductor and internal rotator.  It works in conjunction with the gluteus medius and gluteus maximus to stabilise the leg during the stance phase of walking and running.  The TFL anteriorly rotates your pelvis.  Functionally, the TFL is part of the Lateral Line and the Spiral line, according to Thomas Myers in his book Anatomy Trains.

The Lateral Line

The Lateral Line

The Spiral Line

The Spiral Line

 

SYMPTOMS:

Overload of the TFL can lead to pain and tightness in the front of the hip.  Very common is also pain and tightness in the outer part of the knee and into the ITB.  This is most noticeable when walking or up and down stairs/hills. 

Other symptoms:

  • knee and hip pain (especially outside)

  • the lower back and SIJ

  • upper back

  • calf and achilles

As the TFL pulls the head of the femur bone forwards, chronic increased tone is one of the prime causes of hip osteoarthritis and degeneration. 

HOW THE TFL BECOMES OVERLOADED:

The TFL becomes overloaded with repeated use in the following situations:

  • excessive sitting, driving, kicking

  • walking and running (especially uphill and downhill)

  • cycling, swimming, kayak/canoe

  • meditating crossed legged in lotus position

  • sleeping in the fetal position

  • standing with a swayed back and wearing high heels too often

TREATMENT:

Physiotherapy assessment will involve a comprehensive movement assessment to determine the cause of your TFL issue.

Short term treatment such as soft tissue massage and dry needling is very helpful, while long term building gluteal and core strength is critical to prevent a relapse.

 

TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING:

Tightness and shortening of the TFL responds well to dry needling, which can de-activate the trigger points (knots in the muscle) that can form in chronic cases.  The benefit of dry needling is that it can reach the deep fibers of the muscle and lead to a quicker resolution of symptoms.  Dry needling is certainly an unusual feeling, but definitely beats 15 minutes of deep painful massage in that area.

 

SELF-CARE TIPS:

  • apply heat to the front of your hip 10 minutes each day

  • avoid sitting cross legged

  • avoid walking and jogging uphills and on sloped surfaces in the short-term

  • ensure your shoes are not overly worn

  • sleep on stomach or side with pillow between knees

  • when running - avoid over-striding and endure proper warm up and cool down

  • use cruise control on long car trips to stretch the legs

 

GRADED EXERCISE PROGRAM TO ADDRESS TFL OVERLOAD:

PART 1 STRETCHES:

FOAM ROLLER ITB  Regulate the pressure with your arms and top leg, so pain is less than 5/10.

FOAM ROLLER ITB

Regulate the pressure with your arms and top leg, so pain is less than 5/10.

FOAM ROLLER QUADS  Go harder along the quads. Keep breathing!

FOAM ROLLER QUADS

Go harder along the quads. Keep breathing!

HIP FLEXOR STRETCH  Feel the stretch in the front of your hip as you tuck the pelvis under gently

HIP FLEXOR STRETCH

Feel the stretch in the front of your hip as you tuck the pelvis under gently

FOAM ROLLER TFL  Angle your body across the TFL and roll it with medium to light pressure

FOAM ROLLER TFL

Angle your body across the TFL and roll it with medium to light pressure

PRONE EXTENSION COBRA DECOMPRESSION  Relax on your forearms, let your hips release at the front. Breathe through the diaphragm

PRONE EXTENSION COBRA DECOMPRESSION

Relax on your forearms, let your hips release at the front. Breathe through the diaphragm

PART 2 STRENGTHENING:

The goal is to strengthen and support the muscles around the TFL

BRIDGE  Feel a stretch in the front of your hips while your glutes activate in the back of the hips

BRIDGE

Feel a stretch in the front of your hips while your glutes activate in the back of the hips

CLAM SHELL  Ensure hips stay facing the front and you feel the gluteus medius (back of the hip) activating

CLAM SHELL

Ensure hips stay facing the front and you feel the gluteus medius (back of the hip) activating

SINGLE-LEG BRIDGE  Keep the bridge high as your transfer your weight to each side. Keep activation through the glutes

SINGLE-LEG BRIDGE

Keep the bridge high as your transfer your weight to each side. Keep activation through the glutes

PUSH-UP TO SIDE-PLANK  Activate the obliques as you twist into side plank. Try x3 on each side.

PUSH-UP TO SIDE-PLANK

Activate the obliques as you twist into side plank. Try x3 on each side.

PLANK  Feel the abdominals support your body. Hold 30 seconds. Keep breathing!

PLANK

Feel the abdominals support your body. Hold 30 seconds. Keep breathing!

 

PART 3: POSTURE / NEW MOVEMENT PATTERNS

For many people, the TFL becomes the muscle that is always switched on and over-active.

Try these movements, focusing on keeping your core and gluteals engaged.
STANDING PELVIC-TILTS  Use the abdominals to gently tuck the pelvic under. Keep the shoulders relaxed and breathe through the diaphragm. x10 per hour.

STANDING PELVIC-TILTS

Use the abdominals to gently tuck the pelvic under. Keep the shoulders relaxed and breathe through the diaphragm. x10 per hour.

STANDING HAMSTRING CURLS  Keep the pelvis tucked under and abdominals engaged as you bend the knee by activating the hamstring. Keep the knees aligned during the entire exercise. 3 x10 each side.

STANDING HAMSTRING CURLS

Keep the pelvis tucked under and abdominals engaged as you bend the knee by activating the hamstring. Keep the knees aligned during the entire exercise. 3 x10 each side.

REVERSE LUNGE  Feel the stretch in the front of your left hip as you stretch back and drop the knee towards the ground. Keep your spine straight while gently tucking your pelvic under. x10 each side.

REVERSE LUNGE

Feel the stretch in the front of your left hip as you stretch back and drop the knee towards the ground. Keep your spine straight while gently tucking your pelvic under. x10 each side.

SIT TO STAND SQUATS  Focus on activating the glutes and core as you come up into standing by gently pulling your pelvis under.

SIT TO STAND SQUATS

Focus on activating the glutes and core as you come up into standing by gently pulling your pelvis under.

Stick your butt out as you slowly sit down, keeping your feet and toes in contact with the ground. Repeat 3x10

Stick your butt out as you slowly sit down, keeping your feet and toes in contact with the ground. Repeat 3x10